Tag Archives: Diorama

There’s nothing like a massive LEGO diorama to prove that you’ve arrived as a LEGO builder. The LEGO dioramas we feature here span everything from realistic medieval castles to scenes from World War II, and more than a few 江苏快三走势图post-apocalyptic wastelands.

Maybe the Amazon will save itself

Brick built plants can help make bring a LEGO scene to life. And when the plants are the focus of a diorama, that scene is full of life, such as this collaboration between and . This diorama shows four different sections of the amazon jungle that work together as one scene or as the same scene through time.

Through the series, these builders display a dried riverbed, which is overtaken by a fully grown jungle, then destroyed so someone can mine for gold before the jungle finally begins to retake the land. The vegetation throughout the build is fantastic, so much so that it is difficult to call out any one part! The colour choices are also on point, from the vibrant mixture of greens in the thriving jungle to the more drab dark tan and olive in the mining scene. Not to be overlooked is the subtle landscaping, from the smooth sides of the bricks making up the wet river bed to the slope made up of showing how the miners have dug into the earth.

A very stable genius

A builder who goes by the name of has constructed a LEGO scene depicting a peaceful stable. He tells us that Lacryma, with its rolling plains and temperate climate, has become famous for the quality of the horses bred there. In the settlement of Elizabethville, many stables such as this one were built to house both the equines and their human companions. I would love to live in this world for a little while and maybe brush the horses and banter with the townsfolk. The word for how I feel about this is anemoia, a nostalgia for a time and a place I’ve never known. Are you feeling a bit of anemoia too? It turns out this builder is quite good at evoking feelings for a time and a place we’ve never been to. I hope you can check out the archives to see what I mean.

Containment breach

There’s been a slew of stunning LEGO builds recently that is based on the work of conceptual artists and I, for one, am thrilled. My case in point; this neat creation by is called Containment Breach and is inspired by the work of . is the specific reference material. Bart makes great use of color and composition to replicate the unsettling feel of Francesco’s piece. The fearsome red creature is nestled in the shadows and stands out in stark contrast against gray, white, and black. As one commenter on his Flickr stream puts it, “This is classic Bart” and well…I have to agree. Here’s another recent creation by Bart to show you what they mean.

Goat raid

LEGO released the set nine years ago (yes, you heard it correctly, nine years ago!). To this day this is the only set to feature this particular LEGO . Buying a LEGO goat on Bricklink is like buying a kidney on the black market. Somehow adding a goat adds to your creation makes it ten times as good. 江苏快三走势图 made a beautiful new rendition of this set. And it doesn’t need goats to make it look good. However, he added 4 of them anyway. I am not sure what is being raided in this creation but it would be wise to snatch a goat or two while at it…

My uncle is a great fan of LEGO. He once spoke these wise words: “Making something awesome out of LEGO is not about having a lot of different bricks, it’s about having a lot of the same bricks.” And Hellboy.lego proves him right by using a ton of 1×2 tiles in this creation. Most of the walls and the roofs are composed of 1×2 tiles. Even the blades of the mill are made of them!

Adorable cottage in the woods to raise velociraptors

In a cottage in the woods, there lived a… dinosaur trainer? Sure, why not。 This pastoral scene by is a perfect blend of simplicity and technique from the textured foundation to the interesting use of spiky vines tree branches。 I really like the mostly smooth tile roof, with just a few studs for visual interest。 And take a closer look at that door, with those “espresso handles” for hinges… nice parts usage!

Operation space-goat teleportation

Space is the place for ground-breaking science like figuring out how to teleport rare pieces of your LEGO collection from one place to another. is here conducting the research in his latest diorama. It follows the everyday lives of Sven and his crew at Epsilon IV as a part of Andreas’ ongoing series of cinematic Classic Space builds. This time, the crew is trying out a new contraption to teleport a space-goat, but rest assured, none have been harmed in the process.

The teleportation device is made with a variety of tubes running along a simple frame. The tubes feed into a stack of different-sized radars and a that hovers ominously over the test subject. Alternating long wedge plates and surround a single space-goat, totally oblivious of what’s to come. The platform construction is super captivating to look at and the blue lighting at its center creates a gorgeous atmospheric glow throughout the build. I’m also loving the details scattered around the scene. An old mech makes an appearance in the background, which we assume is used for transporting the space-goat from pod to platform. If you look even closer, you might see that the pods each have a single plant piece for the space-goats to munch on as they wait for their turn. All this talk of space-goat teleportation has many of us wondering when these space-goats will start arriving into our LEGO rooms. We can’t guarantee any goats, but do keep an eye out!

In the meantime, check out some more Neo-Classic Space creations from our archives!

Well, well, well

Huge LEGO dioramas are all well and good, but sometimes you can stop and enjoy the details in isolation. This Viking-style well by would feel at home in any larger collaboration, but works just as well a stand-alone creation. Unrelated, did you ever notice that if you type the same word often enough it stops looking like a real word? Well, I have. Well. Well. Well.

Anyway, there’s a lot to admire about this build. the use of and make for a smooth and well-rounded stone exterior. The use of on the roof add just the right touch of visual interest and Viking-style. I also like the rocky exterior to the display base. It creates the feeling of a much larger scene without making things feel like you’re looking at the cut off top of a hill.

Back in January, we featured another of Marcin’s builds that include a similar well design. Check it out to see how well it works in context!

The deeper picture

LEGO builder shows us how to add structure to a build in his LEGO temple named Deeper. There are so many parts used in an unconventional way that my eyes do not know where to look first. So let’s start from the top. The build features some palm trees made with flex tubing to give it the organic, not so static look and a ‘temple’ entrance covered in sand. The entrance is made of plates with tiles stuck between the studs to create a pattern. It’s almost as if there is a message written on the facade of the building.

Underneath the surface is the actual inside of the ‘temple’ and the walls are packed with intricate details. In the top we see , and the filled with cheese slopes. Further down we come across the good old with a bar filling up the groove hole. To continue with 1×2 bricks filled with . The columns have some stacked to add texture and the tiled floor is made of inlaid cheese slopes.

I wonder how much of this creation is staying in place thanks to friction and gravity.

TBB cover photo for August 2020: A station worth visiting

This month’s cover photo, from , is a model of the Dunedin Railway Station in New Zealand. From the tower to the topiary garden, this scene captures all the nuance found in the Dunedin Railway Station, reportedly, one of New Zealand’s most photographed buildings. If you’d like to learn more about this build, read our previous coverage of this LEGO Dunedin Railway Station that Pieter spent five years building.

your LEGO creations featured across TBB social media for a month! Check out the 江苏快三走势图submission guidelines share your builds today.

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Epic LEGO Forbidden City uses over 80,000 bricks and took over 700 hours to design & build!

Yes, you read the title correctly. has used around 84,000 LEGO bricks, to be more precise. In addition to 300+ hours of building to recreate the Forbidden City in Beijing, China, Rocco also spent 400+ hours designing it first. If that doesn’t blow your mind, it should. That is one giant build of one of the world’s most spectacular architectural sites. Like his earlier LEGO diorama of Ancient Rome, Rocco built this one for a commission for a museum, and boy, does it belong there. The overview picture hardly does it justice, as it all blends together into a blur of flame orange, dark red, and grey, but zoom in and there are as many marvels as in the real deal. Fancy a tour? It’s not forbidden to look at this one, even for a commoner like me.

Check out the details of this incredible build

The wonders of space captivates both young and old

Show of hands, who loved all things having to do with outer space as a kid? Also show of hands, who never lost that dream even as an adult? Right? Space captures the imagination and keeps a child-like fascination within us like nothing else can…except maybe dinosaurs. Instagram user captures this feeling of wonder quite nicely with this LEGO diorama called To the moon. Whether it be the Classic Space t-shirt, the rocket diagram, or even the bunny companion, I can get lost in these details forever. The moon shining through the attic window is a sight to behold. What can I say? I’m a kid all over again!

Car broken down in the middle of nowhere? Call Lonely Joe for a tow.

Some LEGO builders find a niche in the community and spend most of their time building there, churning out beautiful creations that all fit a similar genre. For some that’s castle, for others that’s space, for others it’s Bionicle, and for others it’s some licensed theme or other. For TBB 2019 Builder of the Year , that niche would be shacks and automobiles. Few builders out there can equal the clean lines and perfect textures of his buildings; just look at the uneven tiles for the siding, and the perfection of sideways masonry bricks for the adjacent shed. The build is nearly studless, which helps those clean lines, and the photography is pristine, which helps too.

But don’t let that expert photography fool you; this is not a simple build. You don’t get a studless look by accident, not without plenty of SNOT (studs not on top) techniques. Plus there are myriad clever parts usages. For example, there’s a and a holding lamps; there are on the truck’s bumper; and those sideview mirrors are mighty , I mean, clever. And speaking of the truck, Andrea’s vehicle designs are as clean and elegant as his shacks; no studs, crisp color blocking, and perfect shaping and scaling.